Daily Archives: October 4th, 2017

SOME NORFOLK CHURCHES AND CHAPELS

MORTON CHURCH before the tower fell IN 1959.

MORTON-on-the-Hill is a small village near Ringland. This view of the CHURCH was taken before the tower fell in 1959. After nearly twenty years of dereliction, the remains of the nave and the chancel were restored. It is now a private chapel at which public services are occasionally held.

St Edmund's Chapel,Lyng Eastaugh.

St Edmund’s Chapel, Lyng Eastaugh. It has been abandoned for over 500 years, but was once a popular place where St Edmund was invoked to heal the sick and injured. Many miracles are recorded as happening there.

The Slipper Chapel in WALSINGHAM

The Slipper Chapel in Houghton St Giles next to WALSINGHAM. Walsingham was visited by King Henry VIII on a pilgrimage to give thanks for the birth of his eldest daughter Mary; but when he later fell out with the Pope he confiscated all the monastic lands and sold them. The Slipper Chapel lay abandoned as a farmer’s barn until 1934, when it became the National Shrine of Our Lady for the Roman Catholic Church. This view was taken in the 1930s, before the surrounding buildings associated with the shrine were erected fifty years later.

St Peter's church, Spixworth

St Peter’s church, Spixworth. This was associated with the Longe family for centuries. They were baptised, married and buried here, and several relatives were Rectors of the church. Before the Longes the Peck family were Lords of the Manor, and an impressive monument to James Peck  may be seen inside the nave.

SPARHAM CHURCH

SPARHAM CHURCH. This large church stands in the centre of the village of Sparham. A small but vigorous community keep the  church alive, and the ringers sound the church bells yearly on New Year’s Eve. The church retains a full length picture of St Walstan, once part of the medieval rood screen. Walstan was the local patron saint of farm workers; he died in 1016. His shrine at Bawburgh is once again the site of an annual pilgrimage in May.

 

St MARY'S CHURCH, Kirby Bedon

St MARY’S CHURCH, Kirby Bedon. This ruined Saxon church stands just across the road from that of St Andrew, which is still in use. St Mary’s church survived the Reformation, but was abandoned in the 17th century.  Kirby means ‘the settlement round the church’, and the Danish name dates back to the ninth or tenth century. It obviously had a church back then.

North Runcton Church.

All Saints’ Church, North Runcton. It is unusual for Norfolk in being of an early 18th century date. This elegant classical style church was built in 1713, the previous church having been destroyed when the tower fell twelve years before. It was designed by the architect Henry Bell, whose most famous building is the Custom House in Kings Lynn. Bell was Lord of the Manor of North Runcton.

East end of SWANNINGTON church.

East end of the church of St Margaret, SWANNINGTON. In the 17th century the Rector was an acquaintance of George Herbert, and when the poet died it was he who rescued his manuscripts and delivered them to the Cambridge University Press for publication. His spiritual verse has been popular ever since.

TAVERHAM CHURCH

ST EDMUND’S CHURCH, TAVERHAM. In its earliest remaining parts (illustrate here) this old church dates from the mid eleventh century. Taverham has an interesting past, and the nearby paper-mill  (now demolished) produced much of the paper used for printing the Times in the 19th century. Many paper makers are buried in the churchyard.

Glandford church and ford

Glandford church and the ford. This church appears at first glance to be of medieval date, but was in fact built in the first years of the 20th century. It was erected by the last squire of Glandford in memory of his mother. It was rebuilt on the site of the ruined medieval church of St Martin, which had not been used since the Reformation.

Cley church,

Adjacent to the village of Glandford is Cley-next-the-Sea, and the church is dedicated to St Margret of Antioch. It is a large church that reflects the fact that Cley used to be a major port on the North Norfolk coast. In the middle ages the church used to be even bigger than it is today, with north and south transepts. In an area of more modest church building than Norfolk it could almost be seen as a cathedral.

ST EDMUND'S COSTESSEY

ST EDMUND’S CHURCH COSTESSEY. This church has the distinction in that two people whose lives are recorded in the Dictionary of National Biography are buried here. They were pioneers in their respective fields of music journalism and literary editing. No only that, they were contemporaries; R. M Bacon and his friend Simon Wilkin; the latter’s tomb is to be seen south of the tower. It is surmounted by an urn and surrounded by iron railings (these succumbed to the scrap drive of the Second World War).

The Civic Coach outside St Peter Mancroft.

The City Coach outside St Peter Mancroft in 1951. This church, together with City Hall, dominates the Market Place of the city. It vyes with the cathedral as the centre of Civic worship. The Library, Guildhall, Assembly House and the principal shopping street all crowd into the shadow of St Peter Mancroft. The word Mancroft cones from the Latin Magna Croft – a large open space (i.e. the market).

The Octagon Chapel in Colegate.

The Octagon Chapel in Colegate, NORWICH. This was built for the non-Conformist community of the city and remains the centre of Unitarianism. It is popular for concerts. It was built by the local architect Thomas Ivory in the middle years of the 18th century.

CAISTOR CHURCH

CAISTOR CHURCH, dedicated to St Edmund, and built within the walls of Caistor Camp, the Roman regional capital Venta Icenorum. In Caistor the priest Richard of Caistor was born in the 14th century. He was a prominent spiritual mentor from his establishment at St Stephen’s Church in Norwich, and he too has an entry in the Dictionary of National Biography.

 

MODEL OF WORSTED CHURCH

MODEL OF WORSTEAD CHURCH; the background is not an authentic Norfolk countryside scene; the church is in fact several miles  from the sea. The model was made by me over forty years ago.  This is a ‘Wool Church’ without a doubt, and Worsted is still the name given to a type of cloth.

Hellesdon Village sign showing St Edmund's body and the wolf.

Hellesdon Village sign showing the church. It is dedicated St Mary. Tradition has it that St Edmund was martyred in the parish over a thousand years ago, and the sign illustrates his dead body.  It was found by a friendly wolf, according to the legend.

Drayton church before rebuilding. Encraved by Robert Ladbrooke.

Drayton church before rebuilding in the middle 19th century. The engraving is by local artist Robert Ladbrooke. 

DRAYTON church in the late 19th century, after rebuilding.

DRAYTON church in the late 19th century, after rebuilding. It still looks very similar today.

JOSEPH MASON

joemasonspage@gmail.com

THE BLOG FOR THE STORY OF EAST ANGLIA

Advertisements