GREAT AUNT MILLIE

MILLICENT MASON was my Grandfather Mason’s sister. Both my grandfathers died before I was born, but I met Aunt Millie in 1953 when she was living at Bixley Manor (just outside Norwich) for the birth of Timothy Colman’s first child. She was a highly respected and competent midwife, who had worked in Harley Street earlier in her career. In this way she had established a reputation for excellence among the greatest in the land (the baby she was looking after was a close relative of the Queen Mother). She had worked her way up from very humble beginnings as a housemaid, working at Strangers Hall in Norwich when it was still a private residence. The owner was a solicitor called Leonard Bolingbroke and he gave the house to the city to be turned into a museum of social history.

Millicent Mason

In 1920 Millicent began her nurse’s training at a hospital in South London. In 1923 she qualified as a midwife and by 1925 she was staff nurse in the maternity ward. It was for her not a job but a vocation, and one she pursued with kindness and humanity. Although the work as night sister was hard, she was able to return home regularly to see her father who was living in a cottage in Trowse, Norfolk. I have a picture of Aunt Millie with my Great-grandfather standing in his allotment, tending his beloved flowers. Great-grandfather was still working as a carter in Colman’s mustard business when she moved to London, but he enjoyed a long retirement which was made possible by Lloyd George’s new Old Age Pension. Colman’s were also good employers, who looked after their old employees.

The outbreak of war in 1939 caused the hospital in central London where she had been working to close, but her fine work around the new-born meant she had no difficulty finding other employment. Working throughout the Second World War presented her with plenty of other difficulties however. She retired to Tunbridge Wells where she died unexpectedly at the age of 70.

TESTIMONIALS

ST JAMES’ HOSPITAL

OUSELEY ROAD, BALHAM, SW 12   26th February 1925

It gives me much pleasure to testify to the merits of Miss Millicent M. Mason who came to this Hospital in March 1920 as a probationer nurse and is now leaving us. I have had considerable opportunities of observing her work throughout her stay, first as probationer, then as pupil midwife and latterly as staff nurse in charge of the lying-in ward at night.

She has proved herself highly competent in these various capacities and her wide experience of nursing in its medical, surgical and obstetrical aspects makes her a valuable member of any team. I always found her most pleasant to work with. I am sorry to lose her services.

Wm L. Maccormac, Medical Superintendent

3 UPPER WIMPOLE STREET, CAVENDISH SQUARE, W1

OCT 18/39

It gives me great pleasure to write a testimonial for Sister Mason. She has been in charge of the Maternity, Children’s and Infant’s wards of the London Local Hospital for nine years. During that long time she has done her work excellently and to the satisfaction of the Board. Personally I do not think anyone could have done the work of this difficult post in a better manner. She is kindness personified.

AGNES SIBBS

To: Mr Charles Hughes, a nephew of Aunt Millie:

28th October 1958

Dear Mr Hughes,

I was very sad to hear of the death of my dear friend Millie, & do thank you very much for letting me know.  I felt there must be something wrong, not hearing from her for so long, the last I heard from her she was hoping to come to Bournemouth. I have known her since my son was born 34 years ago & she came to his wedding just over three years ago, which was the last time we saw her.

I was hoping she would be coming this month to see my little grandson. She would have been so pleased as she was very fond of my son. We do take the Telegraph every day, but I seldom look in the deaths column.

One thing we do know, she did not suffer, and thank you once more for writing.

Yours sincerely,

Mrs Y. E. Woodbridge

JOSEPH MASON

joemasonspage@gmail.com

FOR MEMORIES OF EAST ANGLIAN LIFE

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4 responses

  1. How good to have such lovely testimonials to a kind woman

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  2. Poignant midwifery in those days was quite a dramatic art. You needed confidence, dreaded infections, and there were many mums died in childbirth and many babies with problems wouldn’t survive as they do today

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  3. Most interesting family and social history. Thank you for researching and recording it. I would love to have met this remarkable woman

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  4. […] Bowes-Lyon, the surname of the late Queen Mother) is a cousin of the Queen. A  relation of mine (Great Aunt Millicent Mason) was also employed at Bixley Manor just after the Second World War as a nurse to look after the […]

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